Stitching Tip: Monochrome Shading

I don’t know about you but thinking of doing a whole cross stitch piece in one colour truthful sounds like the most boring thing ever. And of course, if you don’t like something you’ll start it but won’t want to finish it.

But what if I really love the pattern and I want to keep it monochromatic?

Well to that I say then you should look at the colour it is and with using a colour chart like the one below pick out all the different shades. You can have the main colour be a dark colour and it goes into little shades or the main could be a light colour and go into darker shades. The choice is up to you.

I do not have the DMC colour chart (which is what is pictured below) however I have also never thought of this idea and I have never done a monochromatic chart without changing it to some kind of variegated thread (my Death by Cross Stitch pattern is a good example of this). But after I have found this idea in Book of Embroidery I thought it was just a wonderful idea so that you can still change up the colours but just with different shades.Now if anyone has used this kind of method before please let me know in the comments and let me know if it made a difference in keeping your interest in stitching the piece.

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Stitching Tip: Changing Colours

I was reading my Book of Embroidery from RSN and I came across something that I have learned before but never applied it to cross stitching before.

So if anyone has ever taken an art class before you will have heard of the colour wheel before.

Now looking at this colour wheel you know that if you want colours that complement each other you choose the colour that is directly across from the colour you want to use. They call these colours complementary colours.

Now I have changed colours in charts before but I thought using a colour wheel would be a great idea if you had a monochrome design and wanted to change it into something with different colours. Well, I think using the picture above could help if you just had no idea really how you wanted the piece to look.

I hope this was a good tip to anyone that is afraid of changing colours, you can start with this and even though it might look like they don’t go together, as long as it is right across they will, sometimes you just actually need to see the colours together instead of just on a wheel.

Cross Stitching Tips 101-Ironing

Sorry, it’s been so long since I have posted one of these. I know I mentioned that I would post one once a week, but since it has been a month since I last posted a tip I guess I wasn’t able to keep to it weekly. With Christmas and then just family things and then of course work I just didn’t have the time to sit down and write a tip. However, now I’m back and hopefully I can start posting these tips once a week again. But I think for now I’m not going to make any promises for that.

So in my last cross stitching tip post I said I would do a post about ironing your piece of cross stitching. Now of course with all the time in the hoop your piece doesn’t really look flat anymore and if you did try framing it, it might not turn out exactly the way you want it to look. Ironing is the perfect way to get rid of all the ridges and curves the hoop made over the time of you stitching it.

Now I’m not sure where I read this, but I read somewhere that putting wax paper between the iron the cross stitch piece was a good idea. Please, do not do this. All that happens is that the wax gets on your iron and it sticks to the iron. Luckily for me, I found what was happening before I completely destroyed my iron and maybe even my piece of work. So anyway what I do(now everyone has a different way of doing something and I’m not saying this is the best way just that it worked for me.) is have the iron on the lowest amount of heat possible that way you won’t risk burning everything. Next, all I did is iron over the piece very carefully, but on the back side of the piece, because I didn’t want to flatten any of the threads just want to get rid of the creases.

So anyway what I do(now everyone has a different way of doing something and I’m not saying this is the best way just that it worked for me.) is have the iron on the lowest amount of heat possible that way you won’t risk burning everything. Next, all I did is iron over the piece very carefully, but on the back side of the piece, because I didn’t want to flatten any of the threads just want to get rid of the creases. And that’s all there is to it. ๐Ÿ™‚

Well, I hope this helps some of you and if you have a different way of ironing please feel free to make a comment and share. I would love to here from other cross stitchers.

Thanks and happy cross stitching ๐Ÿ˜€ !

 

Cross Stitching Tips 101-Framingย 

So I know that I have already done a framing one for you guys, however this time it is actually putting your work in a really frame.

So first you want to iron your piece of work(I will be doing a tip on ironing next week:) )

Once your piece is ironed flat, center your piece on a cut out piece of cardboard of your choice of size, just make sure there is some space alone the edges so that you can fold them over.

Next you want to fold the edges all over like seen here in the picture below:

Me I liked to use tape so that when you flip it over and you realize that it isn’t in the right place you can just take the tape off and fix it to your liking.

For the corners I folded the ends inside to make a triangle so that there for sure wouldn’t be any fraying sticking out.

Then all you have to do is tape it down and put it into the frame of your choice.

Side Note: It works better to buy the frame first and then cut the piece of cardboard to the site of frame then to put your piece on so that you know for sure it is going to fit in properly.

Cross Stitching Tips 101-Easy Framing

So my last project “Friends are Close at Heart” was supposed to be in an actually frame with glass, but when I was putting it in the frame snapped. Which really sucked. I think the frame I used in the picture above was much better for the piece though.

All it is, is a piece of wood cut to the right size and then the edges are wrapped around and then stapled to the wood. For a hook you just have to go buy what is called: “framing hook”. It comes with two loops that you screw into the wooden board on either end, a wire that you twist into each of the loops (now the wire is going across the wooden backing of the frame), a hook, and finally a nail so you can hang it on the wall.

I really liked this kind of framing and would diffently do it again.

Cross Stitching Tips 101-French Knots

Well everyone knows this: French knots are hard to get the hang of, or even if you can get the hang of them you still find that they don’t seem to look that nice. I have this problem too, even though I have been a cross stitcher for five years now (well an estimate).

So I decided I would share with you guys my little trick to avoiding french knots. Don’t worry its really easy and it isn’t a new stitch to learn. All you have to go buy is seed beads. Use a seed bead on your fabric where you would have a french knot.

See what did I tell you, nice and easy. Well bye for now and as always happy crafting. ๐Ÿ™‚

Cross Stitching Tips 101-Starting

I have decided to start putting on some cross stitching tips on my blog. I have been cross stitching for a few years and I believe I have some neat or at least handy ideas for when you are working on your projects.

I might not be posting them all the time, as you can see I don’t post much on here. Which does have to do with trying to find time to work on projects and then also trying to find time to actually post the projects down on here.

But anyway I would like to have one tip each week or at least one every second week, which I think is not too much work and it doesn’t take too much time to write down a tip and share it with you guys.

So tomorrow I will be posting the first tip, so of you miht already know about it, but if you don’t I hope that you will use it in your next project.

As always happy stitching crafters! ๐Ÿ™‚